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Valentine's Day in Japan - not what you'd expect

on . TPL_WARP_PUBLISH . Posted in Blog.

On February 14th in Japan, only the women give presents, namely chocolate. Men don't give women gifts on Valentine's Day.

A second unique feature is that many of the gifts are, literally, obligation chocolate (giri-choko ?????). Giri is a concept that means something like obligation, duty, loyalty to those who have helped you along the way. It is a pay-back side of a relationship characterized by reciprocal obligation. Thus, giri-cho is given by a female to her male boss, teachers, associates and friends to acknowledge the debt owed to them for support or camaraderie. A woman might spend $200 in all.

On the other hand, they also give chocolate to their "true love" (honmei-choko ?????), but this is usually homemade so they can put their love into it.

Japanese females also give "friends chocolates" (tomo choco ????) to enjoy together with friends.

A new trend in the increasingly unmarrying Japanese society are chocolates bought or made just for oneself (jibun choco ?????) to indulge on one's own. According to a recent survey, girls and women spent the most money in this catagory!

When it gets close to Valentine's Day you find women in department stores fighting to buy giri-choko, but also to buy beautiful boxes to put their honmei-choko in (remember, in Japan, chocolates shouldn't be jumbled together but put neatly in little separate compartments and papers).

Reciprocal obligation is the engine that keeps Japanese intact and moving, so of course there has to be a day for the men to return the favor.

White Day, on March 14, is the day that most resembles the Western Valentine's Day, as this is the day that men reciprocate and give gifts back to women. Their gifts include white chocolate, cookies, deserts, flowers, candies, and even fashion accessories.

Remember, in Japan, what goes around must come around. What's your giri in Japan and how do you pay back?

by Diana Rowland
Author of Japanese Business: Rules of Engagement

 

There are several ways that Valentine's Day is unique in Japan, the first being that on February 14th, only the women give presents, namely chocolate. Men don't give women gifts on Valentine's Day.

A second unique feature is that many of the gifts are, literally, obligation chocolate (giri-choko). Giri is a concept that means something like obligation, duty, loyalty to those who have helped you along the way. It is a pay-back side of a relationship characterized by reciprocal obligation. Thus, giri-cho is give by a female to her male boss, associates and friends to acknowledge the debt owed to them for support or camaraderie. A woman might spend $200 in all.

On the other hand, they also give chocolate to their "true love" (honmei-choko), but this is usually homemade so they can put their love into it. When it gets close to Valentine's Day you find women in department stores fighting to buy giri-choko, but also to buy beautiful boxes to put their honmei-choko in.

Reciprocal obligation is the engine that keeps Japanese intact and moving, so of course there has to be a day for the men to return the favor.

White Day, on March 14, is the day that most resembles the Western Valentine's Day, as this is the day that men reciprocate and give gifts back to women. Their gifts include white chocolate, cookies, deserts, flowers, candies, and even fashion accessories.

Remember, in Japan, what goes around must come around.

by Diana Rowland
Author of Japanese Business: Rules of Engagement

- See more at: http://www.international-excellence.com/culturecorner/japan/39-culture-corner/japan/220-giri-choko-japanese-reciprocal-obligation#sthash.RpJJeyvC.dpuf

There are several ways that Valentine's Day is unique in Japan, the first being that on February 14th, only the women give presents, namely chocolate. Men don't give women gifts on Valentine's Day.

A second unique feature is that many of the gifts are, literally, obligation chocolate (giri-choko). Giri is a concept that means something like obligation, duty, loyalty to those who have helped you along the way. It is a pay-back side of a relationship characterized by reciprocal obligation. Thus, giri-cho is give by a female to her male boss, associates and friends to acknowledge the debt owed to them for support or camaraderie. A woman might spend $200 in all.

On the other hand, they also give chocolate to their "true love" (honmei-choko), but this is usually homemade so they can put their love into it. When it gets close to Valentine's Day you find women in department stores fighting to buy giri-choko, but also to buy beautiful boxes to put their honmei-choko in.

Reciprocal obligation is the engine that keeps Japanese intact and moving, so of course there has to be a day for the men to return the favor.

White Day, on March 14, is the day that most resembles the Western Valentine's Day, as this is the day that men reciprocate and give gifts back to women. Their gifts include white chocolate, cookies, deserts, flowers, candies, and even fashion accessories.

Remember, in Japan, what goes around must come around.

by Diana Rowland
Author of Japanese Business: Rules of Engagement

- See more at: http://www.international-excellence.com/culturecorner/japan/39-culture-corner/japan/220-giri-choko-japanese-reciprocal-obligation#sthash.RpJJeyvC.dpuf

There are several ways that Valentine's Day is unique in Japan, the first being that on February 14th, only the women give presents, namely chocolate. Men don't give women gifts on Valentine's Day.

A second unique feature is that many of the gifts are, literally, obligation chocolate (giri-choko). Giri is a concept that means something like obligation, duty, loyalty to those who have helped you along the way. It is a pay-back side of a relationship characterized by reciprocal obligation. Thus, giri-cho is give by a female to her male boss, associates and friends to acknowledge the debt owed to them for support or camaraderie. A woman might spend $200 in all.

On the other hand, they also give chocolate to their "true love" (honmei-choko), but this is usually homemade so they can put their love into it. When it gets close to Valentine's Day you find women in department stores fighting to buy giri-choko, but also to buy beautiful boxes to put their honmei-choko in.

Reciprocal obligation is the engine that keeps Japanese intact and moving, so of course there has to be a day for the men to return the favor.

White Day, on March 14, is the day that most resembles the Western Valentine's Day, as this is the day that men reciprocate and give gifts back to women. Their gifts include white chocolate, cookies, deserts, flowers, candies, and even fashion accessories.

Remember, in Japan, what goes around must come around.

by Diana Rowland
Author of Japanese Business: Rules of Engagement

- See more at: http://www.international-excellence.com/culturecorner/japan/39-culture-corner/japan/220-giri-choko-japanese-reciprocal-obligation#sthash.RpJJeyvC.dpuf

There are several ways that Valentine's Day is unique in Japan, the first being that on February 14th, only the women give presents, namely chocolate. Men don't give women gifts on Valentine's Day.

A second unique feature is that many of the gifts are, literally, obligation chocolate (giri-choko). Giri is a concept that means something like obligation, duty, loyalty to those who have helped you along the way. It is a pay-back side of a relationship characterized by reciprocal obligation. Thus, giri-cho is give by a female to her male boss, associates and friends to acknowledge the debt owed to them for support or camaraderie. A woman might spend $200 in all.

On the other hand, they also give chocolate to their "true love" (honmei-choko), but this is usually homemade so they can put their love into it. When it gets close to Valentine's Day you find women in department stores fighting to buy giri-choko, but also to buy beautiful boxes to put their honmei-choko in.

Reciprocal obligation is the engine that keeps Japanese intact and moving, so of course there has to be a day for the men to return the favor.

White Day, on March 14, is the day that most resembles the Western Valentine's Day, as this is the day that men reciprocate and give gifts back to women. Their gifts include white chocolate, cookies, deserts, flowers, candies, and even fashion accessories.

Remember, in Japan, what goes around must come around.

by Diana Rowland
Author of Japanese Business: Rules of Engagement

- See more at: http://www.international-excellence.com/culturecorner/japan/39-culture-corner/japan/220-giri-choko-japanese-reciprocal-obligation#sthash.RpJJeyvC.dpuf

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